Global Warming and The Place Between Mourning and Action

Six Degrees Could Change the WorldLast night, I declared that the thing that breaks open my heart, the thing that wakes me at three a.m. and turns my sweetly oblivious sleep toward the direction of nightmare is the spectre of global warming. A person who I love has lived his day under a bleak cloud after watching the same program on the National Geographic channel that I did last night, Six Degrees Could Change the World. I was able to tell him that such information galvanizes me at this point; I have done my mourning for the devastation that our modern lifestyle has cast upon this earth, now I am ready to act. Of course, I am realizing now that I may have just been trying to comfort him. I know that I will not finish mourning our stifling planet until I can understand what it means when the glacier at the head of the Ganges has melted and the coral reefs around Australia have all died, and how can I ever comprehend the destruction of natural wonders so vast? It is just as difficult as trying to wrap my mind around the forces that created these beauties in the first place.

The decision to really take on this issue, and make it something that I am aware of with each cup of coffee passed to me in a paper cup and with each shampoo bottle I toss into the trash when I see it is not a number 1,2,3, or 5 and the recycling center has no interest in it, will force my everyday life into a new perspective. Am I really ready for that? Can I find a solution to the 37 miles I drive alone each day on my way to and from work rather than just climb into the car guiltily each morning? Can I bear the inconvenience of keeping a plastic mug and silverware in my purse so that I can cut down on at least one cup and one plastic fork everyday? Can I find somewhere other than beneath torrents of hot water that flow from the shower head to do my best thinking?

Situations like these might lead to minor annoyances or changes in behavior; in the end I will probably reap the great immediate gains of feeling virtuous and proactive. The real problem would arise when I begin to imagine how changes I may feel compelled to make in my own life might make those around me uncomfortable or upset. George Monbiot’s 2006 book Heat: How to Stop the Planet Burning was the first to introduce me to the idea of “love miles” and how those are a part of the environment’s undoing. Inwardly, I “tsk, tsk” at the perpetual business travelers who circumnavigate the globe several times a year in the pursuit of universal capitalism. Monbiot tells his readers that they must accept that one of the great entitlements of western society, air travel, would need to be a thing of the past if we are to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by the degree he believes necessary: 90% by 2030. How do I deal with not being able to fly to see my friends in Ireland or that I might be contributing to the devastation of the Amazon if I went on an “eco-tour” there. I am still unready to think that it would be better for Galway Bay if I never went to see it again. What is even more difficult to imagine are those “love miles” that don’t seem like a vacation or a luxury but necessity like the two hour drive to see my grandfather or the four hour ride to the Cape to see my folks.

What would it mean to be of a generation that once had the entire world at its feet, but now may only have it at its fingertips, making the Internet into the only responsible way to reach out and experience the world?

Perhaps we could realize that we are actually creatures who can only truly experience the world as far as the visible horizon like David Abram talks about in The Spell of the Sensuous. Maybe his vision of local culture is not just a quaint homage to the indigenous peoples of this world; maybe their way of life is a model for our future.

And I have not even addressed the idea of action. I am certainly not finished mourning yet.

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4 thoughts on “Global Warming and The Place Between Mourning and Action

  1. Ruaidhrí February 13, 2008 / 9:09 am

    In line with your little bit of depressive realism you have going on here-remember that big international consurtium of scientists who in the past few months related the report about how global warming is definately happening now and we need to act now?

    Well apparently, that report was an UNDERESTIMATION.

    http://scienceblogs.com/islandofdoubt/2008/02/tipping_points_what_we_dont_kn.php

    On the bright side at least you live inland now and high enough up that the lapping flood waters probably won’t effect you 🙂

  2. girlwhocriedepiphany February 13, 2008 / 9:23 am

    I heard that when the report came out – too many people (governments) would have refused to sign it if things looked too bleak or if measures to fix things would appear too draconian, right? Or I could read the link you sent me… But I am supposed to be working. Right, working.

    And yeah, Mike and I are feeling a little nuts at the thought of moving back to the Cape right now. But then, my road is flooded again this morning (or so Mike said – thanks to the various and sundry gods that I am working from home today!).

  3. Chas Martin March 10, 2008 / 9:36 pm

    I hopt this doesn’t sound foolish, but if actions speak louder than words, thoughts speak louder than actions. My point: the news of the earth’s condition is depressing. We feel compelled, but too small to make a difference. Changing the light bulbs isn’t enough.
    But, finding a vision within ourselves that represents the perfect world we wish we could create is an important step to creating it. I am a believer in visualization as a powerful tool. Visualization alone isn’t enough. But, combined with action, it does create momentum – no matter how small. See: Ideas Change the World http://www.innovativeye.com/blog/2007/2/6/ideas-change-the-world.html

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